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At risk: Herefordshire churches named by Historic England


St Peter's Church in Hereford is on the list. Picture: Google Maps


CHURCHES across Herefordshire are at risk of being lost as they fall into decay, the Historic England at risk register has revealed.


Dozens of churches and religious buildings in Herefordshire are currently listed as being at risk on the Historic England register.

The register lists the health of England’s most valued historic places and those most at risk of being lost as a result of neglect, decay or inappropriate development.


Church of St Peter, St Peter's Square


Grade II* listed.

Set in the city centre, the church features a 13th century tower and four bay arcade, chancel and south chapel, all dating to around 1300.


Historic England said it was extensively rebuilt by Thomas Nicholson between 1880 and 1885, but that the valley between the nave and north aisle leaks and the south pitch slate roof needs urgent renewal.


It is described as being in poor condition and at immediate risk of further rapid deterioration or loss of fabric, with no solution agreed.


St Mary's, Craswall (Image: Phillip Halling/Geograph)


Church of St Mary, Craswall

Grade II* listed

Historic England said the walls of the church, which has a 15th century nave and 17th century south entrance porch, have severe open jointing, structural cracking and the render is falling. The roof slates are failing. The rainwater goods have part fallen.


It is described as being in very bad condition and in slow decay, with no solution agreed.


It was previously described as being at immediate risk of further rapid deterioration or loss of fabric.



Church of St George, Burrington

Grade II listed

Of medieval origins, the nave was rebuilt in around 1855 by S Pountney Smith and the chancel rebuilt and shortened in 1864 by Bodley, Historic England said.


The church has been closed since 2016 as the roof is in a dangerous condition and has been cordoned off due to ongoing falls of tiles. The bad condition of the roof has caused falls of plaster inside the church.


It is described as being in very bad condition and at immediate risk of further rapid deterioration or loss of fabric, with no solution agreed



Church of St Peter, Birley, Birley with Upper Hill

Grade I listed

The church has a 12th and 13th century nave and chancel and 14th century south chapel, with a tower dating from around 1200, Historic England said.


A National Lottery Heritage Fund and Historic England Repair Grant for Places of Worship funded repairs in 2004 remedied tower roof problems and the stonework to the chancel and vestry, but the sandstone rubble stonework is still poor on the tower and south chapel gable. Structural issues have been identified. The church has high aspirations and is working to increase the capacity for activities.


It is described as being in poor condition and at immediate risk of further deterioration or loss of fabric, with a solution agreed but not yet implemented


It was previously described as being in slow decay.



Church of St Mary, Abbey Dore

Grade I listed

Created in around 1634 from the derelict Abbey church of the dissolved Cistercian Dore Abbey, the church dates in part from around 1220 with a 17th century tower.


Historic England said repairs have been completed on the north chapel roof, but issues remain with the roof and drainage from the tower as well as the sandstone ashlar walling, the south ambulatory roof and parts of the north ambulatory roof.

It is described as being in poor condition and in slow decay, with no solution agreed.


Brockhampton Chapel (Image: Phillip Halling/Geograph)


Chapel at Brockhampton Park, Brockhampton

Grade II* listed

The chapel was built in 1798 by Byfield in the Gothic Revival style of a nave and west tower, Historic England said.


It has a structurally bowed slate roof. The ashlar stone mouldings are heavily eroded, but the parapet gutter was repaired in 2017.


It is described as being in poor condition and in slow decay, with no solution agreed.



Ruined Church of St Mary, Avenbury

Grade II* listed and Scheduled Monument

The 12th century church is in ruins, but the tower still stands to full height, Historic England said.


The roof survived to the mid-C20 but has fallen in, and the walls of the nave and chancel are half collapsed and survive only to a few feet in places. Fragments of decorated interior plaster survive. Vegetation clearance has been carried out by the owners under an Historic England Management Agreement. The walls are generally stable but are highly exposed.


It is described as being in very bad condition and at immediate risk of further rapid deterioration or loss of fabric with no solution agreed



Eastern half of the Outer Gatehouse to Wigmore Abbey, Adforton

Grade I listed

The outer gatehouse is associated with the remains of a late 12th and 14th century abbey, Historic England said.


The eastern building is without a roof and in very poor condition with extensive tree growth penetrating parts of the structure. It is without a roof and in very poor condition with extensive tree growth penetrating parts of the structure. Survey work to inform conservation is required. Discussions commenced regarding emergency works and scheme being developed by Herefordshire Council. It is described as being in very bad condition and at immediate risk of further rapid deterioration or loss of fabric, with no solution agreed


St Catherine, Hentland (Image: Richard Croft/Geograph)


Church of St Catherine, Hentland

Grade I listed

Built in 1842, the church was enlarged between 1854-1901 in an Italianate style with apse, cloisters, narthex and campanile by J.P.Seddon for the Rev. William Poole, Historic England said.The latest quinquennial report has identified the need for significant re-roofing, drainage upgrade, and further masonry and pointing repairs. The failure of parts of the roofs is now having a detrimental effect upon the interior with evidence of dampness and damage to timber work.


It is described as being in poor condition and in slow decay, with no solution agreed.



Church of St John the Baptist, Grendon Bishop

Grade II listed

Built in 1787-88 with earlier origins, it was altered and extended in 1870 by FR Kempson, Historic England said.


The church has severe damp problems and slipped tiles are allowing water into the chancel.


It is described as being in very bad condition and at immediate risk of further rapid deterioration or loss of fabric, with no solution agreed



St Silas, Bollingham (Image: Rightmove)


Chapel of St Silas, Bollingham, Eardisley

Grade II* listed

Rebuilt between 1865 and 1867 with the addition of south porch and bellcote, the church's nave roof is 14th century and the roof is covered with sandstone slates.


Historic England said these are heavily overgrown with moss and ferns, decaying the slates. Holes have appeared in the slates covering both roof pitches. The interior is netted to catch falls of plaster from the roof lining.


It is described as being in very bad condition and at immediate risk of further rapid deterioration or loss of fabric, with no solution agreed



Christ Church, Llanwarne

Grade II listed

Dating from 1864, the sandstone in the church has erosion problems and has reacted badly with the limestone ashlar causing severe decay especially on the entrance porch, Historic England said.

It is described as being in poor condition and in slow decay, with no solution agreed.




Church of St James, Kinnersley

Grade I listed

Largely dating from the 13th and 14th centuries, the church has a late 19th century decorative scheme by GF Bodley.


Historic England said the roofs, particularly to the north, were in poor condition due to harmful vegetation growth, but have now been repaired. The interior shows significant signs of damp, possibly associated with the poor condition of the roof. This is affecting much of the decoration.


It is described as being in poor condition and in slow decay, with no solution agreed.



Church of St Andrew and St Mary, How Caple

Grade II* listed

Dating in part from the 14th century, the church's rainwater goods are undersized and failing, Historic England said.


The ashlar stonework of the tower is delaminating and falling. The parapet stonework of the tower is structurally unsound next to the tower access door.


It is described as being in poor condition and in slow decay, with no solution agreed.



Church of St Mary, Hope under Dinmore

Grade II* listed

The church was heavily restored by Kempson in 1877 and 1896, with the small west tower and north chapel still retaining 12th and 13th century fabric, Historic England said.


The north chapel gable has structural movement and the cast iron gutters are cracked, rusting and leaking. The tower sandstone rubble is heavily eroded and has harmful vegetation growth.


It is described as being in poor condition and in slow decay, with no solution agreed.



Church of St Mary Magdalene, Leintwardine

Grade I listed

The church consists of several phases of medieval work and restorations in the late 19th and 20th centuries.


Historic England said repairs were carried out in 2004 but further work was required to roofs over the north aisle, and chapel, and to rainwater goods. A National Lottery Heritage Fund and Historic England Repair Grant for Places of Worship for work to address these was completed in 2014. However problems remain with the north chapel roof and further problems have now emerged of falling mortar from the tower.


It is described as being in poor condition and in slow decay, with no solution agreed.


St James the Great, Ocle Pychard (Image: Fabian Musto/Geograph)


Church of St James, Ocle Pychard

Grade II* listed

The 19th-century decorative clay tile roof slopes are in very poor condition and need re-roofing, Historic England said. The rainwater goods are inadequate and in poor condition, as are the surface water drains. There are low-level open joints to the external walls and some damage to dressed stonework.


It is described as being in poor condition and in slow decay, with no solution agreed.



Church of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Madley

Grade I listed

Largely dating from the 12th and 14th centuries, the church needs major roof repairs, Historic England said.


Repairs have been made to the chancel, but the rest of the aisles and nave roofs continue to fail and deteriorate. Failing rainwater goods and inadequate ground drainage are exacerbating the problems. Some masonry repair and repointing also needed.


It is described as being in poor condition and in slow decay, with no solution agreed.



Church of St John the Baptist, Llanwarne

Grade II* listed

Ruined church dating from the 13th century with later additions.

Historic England said it is a roofless ruin with only the west tower retaining its roof. The masonry is deteriorating due to the persistent seasonal flooding and exposure to the elements. This is especially focused on the window openings and the internal archways. The community are fundraising and developing a scheme of repair.


It is described as being in poor condition and in slow decay, with a solution agreed but not yet implemented.


Previously Historic England said there had been no solution agreed.



Church of St Peter, Pipe and Lyde

Grade II* listed

The church features a late 12th century nave and 14th century chancel largely rebuilt by F Kempson in 1874, Historic England said. The roof needs repair and work is also needed to the tower.


It is described as being in poor condition and in slow decay, with no solution agreed.



Church of St Peter, Peterchurch

Grade I listed

The Norman church has later medieval features and a 13th-century tower with a fibreglass spire, Historic England said.


The interior was remodelled for community use in 2009, but the true condition of the spire is unknown, and options for its future repair need now to be considered. Other essential repairs remain outstanding including replacing missing tiles, repairing roof flashings, urgent holding repair work to the tower parapet gutter, which is cracked and allowing water into the tower.


It is described as being in poor condition and in slow decay, with no solution agreed.



St Mary, Stoke Edith (Image: Phillip Pankhurst/Geograph)


Church of St Mary, Stoke Edith

Grade I listed

The church was rebuilt by the Foleys of Stoke Edith Park in 1740 in the Palladian style by Henry Flitcroft, but retains a 14th century spire, Historic England said.


The roof leaks, causing rot in the nave beam and falls in the plasterwork. The ashlar stone facings are eroding severely. A few stones have fallen from the tower and spire.


It is described as being in very bad condition and at immediate risk of further rapid deterioration or loss of fabric, with no solution agreed.



Church of St Andrew, Wolferlow

Grade II* listed

St Andrew's is an early 12th century church restored in 1863 by Kempson, Historic England said.


The churchyard is maintained and in use, sale of the building has been agreed; planning permission was granted for re-use as a dwelling but has lapsed. Holding repairs to roofs have been completed.


It is described as being in poor condition and in slow decay, a solution agreed but not yet implemented.


It was previously listed as having no solution agreed.


New additions to the register



Church of St Michael, Garway

A former preceptory of the Knights Templar, St Michael dates back to the 12th century but was extended in the 13th and 17th centuries.

The battered tower with a pyramidal roof was extended in C17 and cracks have appeared above the intermediate chamber; slipped or missing tiles to the roof. Stonework and rainwater goods need repairs.


It is described as being in poor condition and in slow decay with no solution agreed.



Church of St Andrew, Bridge Sollers

Dating to the 12th century and extended in the 12th, 13th, 14th, and 15th centuries, the church has been well maintained in the past.


The tower stonework is however now in very poor condition with loose merlons, falling stonework, and cement repairs which are detrimental to the sandstone fabric.


It is described as being in poor condition and slow decay, with no solution agreed.



Church of St Mary, Tyberton

Originally 12th century but rebuilt in 1720 by local mason Robert Pritchard for William Brydges.


Historic England said some windows were unfortunately replaced with plain plate glass in 1880 and the church now has uPVC guttering, but its 18th century furnishings are well preserved.


The church and nave roofs are in poor condition and need reroofing and the rest of the fabric is also in relatively poor condition.


It is described as being in poor condition and slow decay, with no solution agreed.



Removed from the list in 2023



Church of St Michael, Croft Park, Croft and Yarpole

The grade II* listed church was previously described as being in poor condition and in slow decay, with no solution agreed.


Blackfriars Friary, preaching cross and cemetery, and hospital and chapel of St John in Hereford


Scheduled Monument Blackfriars Friary in Hereford was previously described as generally satisfactory but with significant localised problems, being particularly vulnerable to vandalism.



Church of St Peter and St Paul, Church Road, Weobley

The grade I listed church was previously described as being in poor condition and in slow decay, with no solution agreed.



Source: herefordtimes.com



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